The Quintessential Man

“The individual has always had to struggle from being overwhelmed by the tribe. To be your own man is hard business. If you try it, you will be lonely often, and sometimes frightened. But no price is too high to pay for the privilege of owning yourself.”

~ Rudyard Kipling

When one is young, creative abilities are at an all time high. It is in our youth where our greatest ideas and motivations plant their roots. It should therefore be the ultimate goal of human nature to fertilize this; to not let it wither away with time. Societal structure promotes obedience, and in doing so promotes the death of creativity.

“He who belies his talent, the born painter who sells stockings instead, the intelligent man who lives a stupid life, the man who sees the truth and keeps his mouth shut, the coward who gives up his manliness, all these people perceive in a deep way that they have done wrong to themselves and despise themselves for it.”

~ Abraham Maslow

So the question remains: how does does one achieve eternal satisfaction, or self-actualization? The need for self-actualization resides deep within us, demanding change. It is our choice whether or not to answer this call, but first we must meet our biological needs, both physiological and psychological. Food, water, and shelter are basic necessities of human survival, yet it does not end there. Our psychological needs — the need for safety and belongingness, the necessity of adequate self-esteem — are essential components to the quintessential man.

“Self-actualizing people have the wonderful capacity to appreciate again and again, freshly and naively, the basic goods of life, with awe, pleasure, wonder, and even ecstasy, however stale these experiences may have become to others.”

~ Abraham Maslow

The quintessential man is free from social acceptance and societal expectation, and does not fear the subsequent repercussions. This is the man I strive to become.

AT

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